Baltimore and lesbian dating

05-Nov-2017 22:13

"It's not just about Pride or the story of someone queer getting beat down."Housier, an Army brat who moved around the world and landed in Virginia after college, met Young, a West Baltimore native, in 2005 through an online dating service.

They spent four years going back and forth between Baltimore and Arlington before they decided to move in together.

At the time, there were four lesbian bars, a lesbian coffee shop and the LGBT bookstore Lambda Rising, none of which are still around, she said.

She still misses those things, she said, but also sees value in LGBT people in Baltimore today creating their own pop-up spaces as broader cultural acceptance narrows the need — and limits the success — of gay-only commercial ventures. And, of course, the ballroom houses — those make-your-own families of voguers, dancers and identity-performers that define Baltimore's LGBT scene for many young people.

Harris, a credit analyst, and Martin, a real estate analyst, said they sometimes wish they knew more gay couples in the city — black or otherwise — though they're starting to meet more.

They also don't know, for a few reasons, whether Baltimore will be it forever."Atlanta," Harris said, a smile peaking out of the side of his mouth.

Thousands fill the city from all around the region, and cameras capture rainbow-fringed images of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community in revelry.

Truth be told, everyday life for gay people in Baltimore is far less flashy.

baltimore and lesbian dating-57baltimore and lesbian dating-78baltimore and lesbian dating-55

Young remembers growing up and coming out in Baltimore years ago.In a city that, according to one study, has more African-American-led same-sex households, per capita, than any other city in the United States, they just like many.At Baltimore's annual Pride celebrations this weekend, it will be easy for visitors to get a distorted impression of what being gay in Charm City means, they and others say.(Martin got over that at his own pace.)"We came a long way," he said."Didn't we, though?" said Harris, putting his hand on his fiance's forearm.

Young remembers growing up and coming out in Baltimore years ago.In a city that, according to one study, has more African-American-led same-sex households, per capita, than any other city in the United States, they just like many.At Baltimore's annual Pride celebrations this weekend, it will be easy for visitors to get a distorted impression of what being gay in Charm City means, they and others say.(Martin got over that at his own pace.)"We came a long way," he said."Didn't we, though?" said Harris, putting his hand on his fiance's forearm.Larry Harris and Leonard Martin grew up around the block from each other but never knew it at the time, caught up as they were in regular childhood concerns and in keeping their heads down in the men-are-macho environment of West Baltimore.