Dating girls in jordan

06-Jul-2016 11:53

A wider custom Early marriages are by no means unheard of elsewhere in the Middle East and North Africa region.In Jordan itself, women’s rights activists are still battling to amend the current Personal Status Law.The brides’ young age and the perception of their inferior status as refugees put them at risk of sexual exploitation and other abuse within these marriages, some of which may be temporary.It is important to remember that getting married at a young age is a long-standing practice in Syria, particularly among the rural population.Like other Syrian women refugees I met during a recent visit to Jordan, Khawlah – who lives in the Jordanian capital Amman – complained how Jordanian men constantly bombard her with marriage proposals or requests to arrange marriages with refugee girls.

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While this reality does not mean the risks associated with the practice are any less serious, it highlights the entrenched nature of the practice and how difficult it is to combat.Farah told me that on one occasion she preferred to endure thirst for a whole day until her husband returned from work, rather than contacting the company which supplies drinking water to their neighbourhood – in Jordan drinking water must be purchased – out of fear the delivery men might harass her and her husband’s jealousy would be fuelled.“My husband is jealous because I get harassed all the time.Some even spoke of “marriage markets” in the Za’atri refugee camp, or matchmakers who arrange temporary marriages between young Syrian brides and suitors from the Gulf.However, during discussions with activists and aid workers in Jordan, it quickly became evident that the reality is much more complex than the picture that was portrayed by some news reports.

While this reality does not mean the risks associated with the practice are any less serious, it highlights the entrenched nature of the practice and how difficult it is to combat.

Farah told me that on one occasion she preferred to endure thirst for a whole day until her husband returned from work, rather than contacting the company which supplies drinking water to their neighbourhood – in Jordan drinking water must be purchased – out of fear the delivery men might harass her and her husband’s jealousy would be fuelled.

“My husband is jealous because I get harassed all the time.

Some even spoke of “marriage markets” in the Za’atri refugee camp, or matchmakers who arrange temporary marriages between young Syrian brides and suitors from the Gulf.

However, during discussions with activists and aid workers in Jordan, it quickly became evident that the reality is much more complex than the picture that was portrayed by some news reports.

While we were in Jordan, my colleagues and I met a number of women refugees of different age groups who were children when they got married back in Syria.