Matrimonial dating sites for arabs

09-Mar-2017 09:53

(Greek Konstantinoupolis ; city of Constantine) Capital, formerly of the Byzantine, now of the Ottoman, Empire.Constantinople occupies one of the most beautiful and advantageous sites in the world, uniting as it does Europe with Asia and putting in communication the Black Sea and all Southern Russia with the greater part of Europe and Asia, and even with distant America.In the long war between Constantine and Licinius (314-323) it embraced the fortunes of the latter, but, after his defeat at Chrysopolis (Scutari), submitted to the victor.

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In general the other cities of the Roman world were stripped to embellish the "New Rome ", destined henceforth to surpass them all in greatness and magnificence.

Traces of Christianity do not appear here before the end of the second or the beginning of the third century.

In 212 Tertullian commemorates the joy of the Christians at the defeat of Pescennius Niger ("Ad Scapulam", iii: "Cæcilius Capella in illo exitu Byzantino: Christiani gaudete"). A probably reliable tradition makes the Byzantine Church a suffragan of Heraclea in Thrace at the beginning of the third century.

The population is estimated (1908) at 1,200,000 inhabitants, four-fifths of whom are in Europe.

There are about 600,000 Turks or other Mussulmans ; the remainder include, in order of numerical importance, Greeks, Armenians, Jews, and foreigners of various nationalities.

In general the other cities of the Roman world were stripped to embellish the "New Rome ", destined henceforth to surpass them all in greatness and magnificence.

Traces of Christianity do not appear here before the end of the second or the beginning of the third century.

In 212 Tertullian commemorates the joy of the Christians at the defeat of Pescennius Niger ("Ad Scapulam", iii: "Cæcilius Capella in illo exitu Byzantino: Christiani gaudete"). A probably reliable tradition makes the Byzantine Church a suffragan of Heraclea in Thrace at the beginning of the third century.

The population is estimated (1908) at 1,200,000 inhabitants, four-fifths of whom are in Europe.

There are about 600,000 Turks or other Mussulmans ; the remainder include, in order of numerical importance, Greeks, Armenians, Jews, and foreigners of various nationalities.

The two European sections are Stamboul (ancient Byzantium), whose suburbs border the Sea of Marmora; Galata and Pera, more or less Europeanized quarters, with many villages rising in rows along the green hills that look down on the Golden Horn and the Bosporus. Uskudar; Chrysopolis ) and Kadi-Keui (Chalcedon), with their extensive suburbs on the Asiatic shore of the Bosporus, the pleasant coasts of the Gulf of Nicomedia, and the Isles of the Princes.