Sex morocco

19-Jul-2017 04:33

Prescriptions are to be strictly applied without attempting to understand and/or discuss them.

A female secretary in an insurance office in Fez believes that “the cannot consent to young people making love before they get married.” For the majority the traditional, restrictive prescriptions of Islam stem from the essence of Islam.

The young people claim that they are subject to strong sexual temptations and, at the same time, to an Islamic sexual ethic that proscribes all premarital sexual activity.

To counter the risk of HIV infection, some believe that Islam must adapt to the current situation of young people, who, for economic reasons, are often unable to marry.

It means protected sexual activity for young people, until the problems of illiteracy, poverty and unemployment can be solved, and young people can get married.” According to a male university student, “Islam in Morocco cannot propose any solutions because of fundamentalist opposition.” The student’s perception is accurate.

The journal , a publication of the radical Islamist association al-‘Adl wa al-Ihsan, published an article by Abderrazaq El Marrouri that is extremely critical of prophylactics.

They cannot practice abstinence..there is AIDS.” In Morocco, some young women wish that Islam were more comprehensive: “It should give people the right to have a sex life without being punished.” An Islamist male architect in Fez says: “The original solution is abstinence.

Given the conditions in which young people live and the fact that abstinence is non-existent, the condom is the temporary...solution....

For them, Islam needs to be interpreted to meet the needs of a contemporary society.[1] In 1997, the high number of STD infections led The Population Council’s MEAwards Program [2] to fund a study of the relationship between HIV and sexual behavior among young Moroccans.Conducted by the author, the study, called “Youth, AIDS and Islam,” consisted of interviews with controlled samples of young Moroccans in Morocco and living abroad.They hope that the will permit them to engage in premarital sexual activity.For some of those interviewed, of course, Islamic norms regarding sexual activity are not subject to opinion because opinion is not relevant to matters of religion.

For them, Islam needs to be interpreted to meet the needs of a contemporary society.[1] In 1997, the high number of STD infections led The Population Council’s MEAwards Program [2] to fund a study of the relationship between HIV and sexual behavior among young Moroccans.Conducted by the author, the study, called “Youth, AIDS and Islam,” consisted of interviews with controlled samples of young Moroccans in Morocco and living abroad.They hope that the will permit them to engage in premarital sexual activity.For some of those interviewed, of course, Islamic norms regarding sexual activity are not subject to opinion because opinion is not relevant to matters of religion.[3] The study asked if young Moroccans understood the risk of HIV infection and if this understanding was sufficient to produce changes in sexual behavior.